Tips for Reducing Environmental Allergens at Home

environmental allergens

It is not uncommon for those with food allergies to also have environmental allergies and/or asthma, as well. In order to create a more allergy-friendly environment, you want to reduce the amount of environmental allergens and asthma triggers in your home.

Here are some tips for reducing environmental allergens and triggers:

  • Declutter and organize your space. It is hard to clean around significant amounts of clutter. Clutter easily becomes a magnet for common allergens like dust, mold, pollen, animal fur, dander, and food crumbs and residue.
  • Remove, replace, and/or clean bedding, pillows, carpets, rugs, curtains, stuffed animals and other fabric items on a regular basis, as they are known to house a lot of common allergens.
  • Keep windows closed and use the air conditioning to reduce the number of airborne allergens and pollen from outside during peak pollen seasons. Open windows to improve ventilation in your home pollen counts are not high.

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Is Your Home Making Asthma and Allergies Worse?

asthma allergies

Well, it’s National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month and Clean Air Month (among many other things, like Food Allergy Action Month, Celiac Awareness Month, Arthritis Awarness Month, Lupus Awarness Month, etc) and I want to talk to you about the air in your home and how it could be affecting your asthma or allergies.

Did you know that the level of indoor air pollution inside the home is often 2-5 times higher than air pollution levels outside? And sometimes it is 100 times higher. Indoor air pollutants are of particular concern because most people spend as much as 90% of their time indoors.¹

Poor indoor air quality is associated with a number of chronic health conditions such as asthma and allergic diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), airborne respiratory infections and cardiovascular disease. And unfortunately, indoor air quality is only getting worse.²

Since the energy crisis in the 1970’s, we’ve been on a quest to make our homes more energy-efficient to conserve energy and reduce energy costs. Overtime, our homes have become increasingly airtight. As homes become more airtight, air exchange has decreased. Less fresh air is coming into our homes and more polluted air is staying in. 

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